1. 13:17 4th Mar 2014

    Notes: 49

    Reblogged from gettyimages

    Tags: brain

    gettyimages:

    Leo, aged 9 months, takes part in an experiment at the ‘Birkbeck Babylab’ Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, on March 3, 2014 in London, England. The experiment uses an electroencephalogram (EEG) to study brain activity whilst the baby examines different objects of varying complexity. Researchers at the Babylab, which is part of Birkbeck, University of London, study brain and cognitive development in infants from birth through childhood. The scientists use various experiments, often based on simple games, and test the babies’ physical or cognitive responses with sensors including: eye-tracking, brain activation and motion capture. (Photo by Oli Scarff/Getty Images)

     
  2. A bit late to this, but it is still so good to listen to the music and read the stories that @nprmusic has put together here

     
  3. 13:46 14th Feb 2014

    Notes: 18

    Reblogged from gettyimages

    Tags: animalsnatural science

    gettyimages:

    Incredible new images of a Jackson’s Chameleon and Horned Sand Viper from Tim Flach. Find the images here.

     
  4. 11:38 11th Feb 2014

    Notes: 80

    Reblogged from archivesofamericanart

    archivesofamericanart:

In Spanish, Valentine’s Day is sometimes called Dia de los Enamorados, or Lovers’ Day.
Zaida Ortega Dominguez letter to Humberto Dionisio, 1987 Feb. 7-14. Humberto Dionisio papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

    archivesofamericanart:

    In Spanish, Valentine’s Day is sometimes called Dia de los Enamorados, or Lovers’ Day.

    Zaida Ortega Dominguez letter to Humberto Dionisio, 1987 Feb. 7-14. Humberto Dionisio papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

     
  5. image: Download

    Animal Feet - ‘Primary Geography - with illustrations’ by Alexis Everett Frye, 1894 - from British Library’s Flickr Photostream
(via Image taken from page 95 of ‘Primary Geography. [With illustrations.]’ | Flickr - Photo Sharing!)

    Animal Feet - ‘Primary Geography - with illustrations’ by Alexis Everett Frye, 1894 - from British Library’s Flickr Photostream
    (via Image taken from page 95 of ‘Primary Geography. [With illustrations.]’ | Flickr - Photo Sharing!)

     
  6. 12:36 8th Feb 2014

    Notes: 26597

    Reblogged from erikkwakkel

    Tags: runesvikings

    image: Download

    erikkwakkel:

Sealed with a kiss
This discovery about a secret Viking message is special - and will put a big smile on your face. For years researchers have tried to crack a Viking rune alphabet known as Jötunvillur. It is found in some 80 inscriptions, including the one above, which dates from the 11th or 12th century. Recently the news broke that a runologist in Norway was successful. It turns out that you had to replace the rune character with the last letter of the sound it produced. So the rune for “f”, which was pronounced like “fe”, represented an “e”. And so researchers were able to decode the 900-year-old message on the piece of wood above, which turned out to be - wait for it… - “Kiss me”! It gets better, however. It turns out that coding and decoding such messages was a playful game, a leisure activity. This is clear from the fact that some of the inscriptions invite the reader to solve the code, stating for example “Interpret these runes.” This, of course, makes the discovery of the “Kiss me” message even more sensational. The kiss was no doubt the reward for the successful individual who cracked this particular message. Two Viking lovers entertaining themselves with a playful coding game - that came with a delightful climax. Awesome.
More information: this Norwegian article originally reported the story, which is also the source of the image (made by Jonas Nordby, the researcher who cracked the code). I picked up the story from the invaluable Medievalists blog (here).

    erikkwakkel:

    Sealed with a kiss

    This discovery about a secret Viking message is special - and will put a big smile on your face. For years researchers have tried to crack a Viking rune alphabet known as Jötunvillur. It is found in some 80 inscriptions, including the one above, which dates from the 11th or 12th century. Recently the news broke that a runologist in Norway was successful. It turns out that you had to replace the rune character with the last letter of the sound it produced. So the rune for “f”, which was pronounced like “fe”, represented an “e”. And so researchers were able to decode the 900-year-old message on the piece of wood above, which turned out to be - wait for it… - “Kiss me”! It gets better, however. It turns out that coding and decoding such messages was a playful game, a leisure activity. This is clear from the fact that some of the inscriptions invite the reader to solve the code, stating for example “Interpret these runes.” This, of course, makes the discovery of the “Kiss me” message even more sensational. The kiss was no doubt the reward for the successful individual who cracked this particular message. Two Viking lovers entertaining themselves with a playful coding game - that came with a delightful climax. Awesome.

    More information: this Norwegian article originally reported the story, which is also the source of the image (made by Jonas Nordby, the researcher who cracked the code). I picked up the story from the invaluable Medievalists blog (here).

     
  7. 14:07 5th Feb 2014

    Notes: 12

    Reblogged from vsw

    Tags: historyWWIIchildrengas mask

    vsw:

    British Children Being Fitted With Gas Masks

    from the VSW Soibelman Syndicate News Agency Archive

    vsw.org

     
  8. 11:09 2nd Feb 2014

    Notes: 299

    Reblogged from wmagazine

    Tags: qalam

    image: Download

    wmagazine:

"Our House is on Fire" by Shirin Neshat, 2013. 
Photograph courtesy of the artist. 

    wmagazine:

    "Our House is on Fire" by Shirin Neshat, 2013. 

    Photograph courtesy of the artist. 

     
  9. 14:24 29th Jan 2014

    Notes: 452

    Reblogged from lacma

    Tags: museum

    A museum is a place where one should lose one’s head.
    — 

    Renzo Piano 

    (Not literally, of course. http://bit.ly/lacmavisit)

     
  10. 14:23

    Notes: 171

    Reblogged from guardian

    Tags: photographynycballet

    guardian:

    Eye-popping ballet: JR’s NYCB installation

    New York City Ballet invited the French artist JR to work with the company’s dancers and create an art installation. Here are the stunning results. See more

    Photographs, top to bottom: Marc Azoulay/NYCB; jr-art.net.